L'Étranger

During the war, French novelist, Albert Camus joined the French Resistance cell Combat, which published an underground newspaper of the same name. This group worked against the Nazis, and in it Camus assumed the nom de guerre Beauchard. Camus became the paper's editor in 1943. 

When the Allies liberated Paris in August 1944, Camus witnessed and reported the last of the fighting. Soon after the event on 6 August 1945, he was one of the few French editors to publicly express opposition and disgust to the United States' dropping the atomic bomb in Hiroshima. He resigned from Combat in 1947 when it became a commercial paper. 

Camus died on 4 January 1960 at the age of 46, in a car accident near Sens. In his coat pocket was an unused train ticket. He had planned to travel by train with his wife and children, but at the last minute he accepted his publisher's proposal to travel with him.

The driver of the car, Michel Gallimard, who was Camus's publisher and close friend, also died in the accident. In August 2011, a Milan newspaper reported a theory that the writer had been the victim of a Soviet plot.

Camus was the second-youngest recipient, at the age of 44, of the Nobel Prize in Literature, after Rudyard Kipling at the age of 42.